Socio-legal Studies

Socio-legal studies is an interdisciplinary research field in which law is explored as a social phenomenon. Research in this area aims to understand how legal ideas, practices and institutions are influenced by or function within the cultural, economic, historical, political and social context. Scholars often draw on social theory or critical theory as well as other disciplines, such as cultural studies, anthropology, criminology, economics, sociology, to inform their theoretical, conceptual and methodological approaches.

Programmes eligible for NWSSDTP funding

N.B. Master’s programmes can only be funded as part of a 1+3/2+2 Studentship

Keele University

Lancaster University

University of Liverpool

University of Manchester

For information on how to apply for funding, please visit our How to Apply page.

Pathway Representatives

Contact details for Socio-legal Studies Pathway Representatives at each institution can be found here

Current Socio-legal Studies NWSSDTP students

Luke GrahamLuke David Graham (2017 Cohort)

 

Destitution as A Denial of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: Addressing Destitution in The UK Through a Human Rights Framework

This project addresses Destitution in the United Kingdom using a Human Rights framework. Destitution remains an ill-defined concept, as such in order to address destitution this project will enunciate the first and only current Human Rights-Based definition of destitution. This will allow new mechanisms to be brought to bear which will in turn contribute to the prevention of destitution.


crawford 2Ben Crawford (2018 Cohort)

 

Employment rights and the shareholder: Workers rights vs. ‘owners’ rights

The thesis will provide a detailed and schematic exposition of the relationship between corporate law and labour rights. The project will analyse the mechanisms by which shareholder rights in the corporation serve to limit the realisation of labour rights, particularly in the context of a world of work characterized by outsourcing, franchising, complex corporate groups and long supply chains.


 

%d bloggers like this: