North West Social Science Doctoral Training Partnership

Unconventional Oil and Gas in South Africa: Science, Technology and Policy

Vilakazi St pic

Jack Hemingway, Development and Humanitarianism in an Unequal World, Lancaster University, 2018 cohort

South Africa is seeing an increased interest in the exploitation of its extensive shale gas and coal seam gas reserves. These developments could fundamentally alter the South African energy landscape and are potentially of enormous economic benefit to the country. The promise of jobs, cheaper and (potentially) cleaner fuel, and a massive GDP boost are particularly attractive to South Africa, with its ongoing energy and unemployment crises. But, as in other countries, the exploitation of unconventional oil and gas (UOG), particularly by hydraulic fracturing (or fracking), is proving controversial.

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NWSSDTP Fieldwork in Chile: September 2018 – September 2019

Richard Smith

Richard Smith, Language Based Area Studies, University of Liverpool, 2018 Cohort

I have just started the third year of my PhD, having spent much of my second year in Chile doing fieldwork. I am studying the role of secondary school and university students in the opposition to the brutal dictatorship that was in power there between 1973 and 1990. During my first year I had identified some archives to explore, but, as the regime’s rule was pitiless, with thousands of people killed or disappeared, tens of thousands imprisoned and tortured, and hundreds of thousands forced into exile, those resisting military rule, and the secondary school students in particular, rarely committed much to paper.  Read More

Joint AHRC/ESRC DTP Impact Event 

will medd

Macarena Rueda, Social Statistics, University of Liverpool, 2018 Cohort

On the 6th of November I attended the North West ESRC / AHRC Doctoral Training Partnerships Impact Event at the University of Liverpool.

Before going into details about the presentations, I want to start by saying that I’m a Year 1 PhD student, and this workshop has completely changed the way I’m approaching my research. Although I knew it was important to connect with the relevant people/institutions that could be impacted by my research, I never thought about ways to measure it….

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How low can you go?: How age-appropriate research methods can help identify behaviours in children from an earlier age.

owen waddington

Owen Waddington, Psychology, University of Manchester, 2018 Cohort

Asking for help from others is something we do all the time, and children are certainly no strangers to it. They request help with their homework, cutting up their food, and even with the simplest of things like tying their shoelaces (thank goodness for Velcro). But there are rules in place when requesting help which, if breached, can land you in hot water. If I ask you to pass the salt at the dinner table, for example, you pretty much have to comply. On the other hand, if I ask you to drive to the local store to buy me more pepper, leaving your dinner to go cold, you are likely to complain and quite rightly so. Likewise, we know from The Boy Who Cried Wolf that making false claims, like asking for help when you do not actually need it, can end poorly. The upshot being that as adults we have learned when we should and should not ask others for help. But when does this awareness develop in children?

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