Social Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine

The Pathway invites applications that situate science, technology and medicine (STM) within broad social contexts. It focuses on themes that explore how scientific knowledge, and knowledge more generally, is shaped by social actors, processes and realities. It also studies how STM itself shapes society and the social perceptions of and attitudes towards science, technology and medicine. Our focus is interdisciplinary and encompasses diverse fields such as history, history of science and medicine, science and technology studies (STS), sociology, anthropology, environmental studies, and human and nonhuman health. The Pathway encourages postgraduate and postdoctoral projects with local and global focus. In the past few years, we have received applications on themes such as the changing fortunes of the dairy and fishery industries in Britain, neuroscience research in the UK, urban planning and public health, neonatal health and social inequality, and riverine ecologies in South Asia.

Programmes eligible for NWSSDTP funding

N.B. Master’s programmes can only be funded as part of a 1+3/2+2 Studentship

Keele University

Lancaster University

University of Liverpool

University of Manchester

For information on how to apply for funding, please visit our How to Apply page.

Pathway Representatives

Contact details for Social Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine Pathway Representatives at each institution can be found here

Current Social Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine NWSSDTP students

NaylorRobert Naylor (2018 Cohort)

Working Atmospheres: Applied and Industrial Meteorology in Britain 1945 – Present

I aim to explore the role of applied meteorology in mitigating the economic weather sensitivity in Britain by asking:

  • What historical, economic and institutional drivers have bolstered the growth of industrial meteorology?
  • Has applied meteorological information contributed to weather resilience in UK industry?
  • What factors have facilitated or impeded knowledge flows between providers, intermediaries and users of weather information?

 

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